Perspectives in Psychotherapy
Oct
6
2:00 PM14:00

Perspectives in Psychotherapy

In this salon we will discuss the possible benefits and limitations of psychotherapy. From Freud and Jung to more modern perspectives, we will question different methods in psychotherapy and their outcomes, particularly the honest confrontation with pain in relation to vitality. Everything from dreams and sexuality to anxiety and the ego, will be explored.

Bob Walters, a California based psychologist, will act as speaker, offering his perspectives on developments in this field.

Location upon RSVP

RSVP required to justinek@publicspheresalons.com

 

*Please note: this salon may be filmed or photographed. By partaking in the salon you (and your guests if you bring them) are agreeing to the possibility of being filmed or photographed.


Image attribution

By UnknownUnknown author (Sigmund Freud's 1909 Visit to Clark University) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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The Vulgar and the Grotesque
Nov
17
2:00 PM14:00

The Vulgar and the Grotesque

 

In 1777 Mozart wrote a letter, a paragraph of which said the following: 

Wouldn't you like to visit Herr Gold-smith again?—but what for?—what?—nothing!—just to inquire, I guess, about the Spuni Cuni fait, nothing else, nothing else?—well, well, all right. Long live all those who, who—who—who—how does it go on?—I now wish you a good night, shit in your bed with all your might, sleep with peace on your mind, and try to kiss your own behind; I now go off to never-never land and sleep as much as I can stand. Tomorrow we'll speak freak sensubly with each other. Things I must you tell a lot of, believe it you hardly can, but hear tomorrow it already will you, be well in the meantime. Oh my ass burns like fire! what on earth is the meaning of this!—maybe muck wants to come out? yes, yes, muck, I know you, see you, taste you—and—what's this—is it possible? Ye Gods!—Oh ear of mine, are you deceiving me?—No, it's true—what a long and melancholic sound!—today is the write I fifth this letter. Yesterday I talked with the stern Frau Churfustin, and tomorrow, on the 6th, I will give a performance in her chambers, as the Furstin-Chur said to me herself. Now for something real sensuble!  Read the full letter here

How could such a genius, so sensitive to beauty be capable of writing something so crude? Does his vulgarity diminish from his art? Do we take offense to his words or does his directness appeal to our modern ears? How has unrefined taste influenced culture, fashion, music and the arts historically and how is it influencing our society now? In this salon we will question what makes something vulgar or grotesque. We will interogate everything from the dangers associated with vulgarity to the potentially liberating quality of the profane. In 2017 the Barbican had an exhibition called The Vulgar: Fashion Redefined. Prior to the salon you can view the images in this article for inspiration. 

Location upon RSVP

RSVP required to justinek@publicspheresalons.com

 

*Please note: this salon may be filmed or photographed. By partaking in the salon you (and your guests if you bring them) are agreeing to the possibility of being filmed or photographed.

Image Attribution: Caravaggio [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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 Metamorphosis and Rebirth
Jun
16
2:00 PM14:00

Metamorphosis and Rebirth

“I cannot make you understand. I cannot make anyone understand what is happening inside me. I cannot even explain it to myself.” -Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka

Does personality and the soul remain constant, or are they perpetually in flux? When have you experienced a change within yourself, an epiphany or awakening, that fundamentally transformed who you were as a person? What brought about this change and how did it inform your perception of the world?  Is every day a small birth in which new possibilities of being are actualized? Do you believe in an infinite potentiality intrinsic to every person or are we defined by a limited number of traits and characteristics? 

In this salon we will consider metamorphosis and rebirth, especially as it relates to the nature of being. 

Location upon RSVP

RSVP required to justinek@publicspheresalons.com

 

*Please note: this salon may be filmed or photographed. By partaking in the salon you (and your guests if you bring them) are agreeing to the possibility of being filmed or photographed.

Image Attribution: [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

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On Eccentricity
Apr
28
4:00 PM16:00

On Eccentricity

 

“Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.” -Bertrand Russell
 

What makes someone eccentric? Are people born eccentric or is it cultivated in their social environment? What is its relationship to intellectualism and the arts? Are true eccentrics aware of their own eccentricity? Does a society loose something important when it stifles idiosyncrasies or are they a threat to stability and social order? What can we learn from those who think and act radically differently from the majority? Do they reveal some greater truths about the world? In this salon we will consider the nature of eccentricity and examine the lives of those who have lived a vicariously eccentric existence, challenging our perspective on a fixed reality and seeing beyond what is to what could be. 

Joining us as speaker is Patric Dickinson, respected genealogist, Clarenceux King of Arms at the College of Arms and Secretary of the Order of the Garter.

Location upon RSVP

RSVP required to justinek@publicspheresalons.com

 

*Please note: this salon may be filmed or photographed. By partaking in the salon you (and your guests if you bring them) are agreeing to the possibility of being filmed or photographed.
Hieronymus Bosch [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
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On Death
Mar
24
4:00 PM16:00

On Death

 

“I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it.” 
― Mark Twain

In this salon we will explore philosophical and psychological questions concerning the nature of death. Among them we will consider if we ever truly die, or if we merely enter a different state of existence, how our mortality impacts the way we live our lives, what it means to die a good death, especially in relation to Socratic philosophy, as well as the benefits or problems associated with positive and negative perceptions of death. We will also explore certain philosophical arguments such as Plato's Cyclical Argument (summarized below.) 

To begin the salon we will stage a mock funeral like they do in South Korea , writing our own eulogies and attending our own funerals as an experiment to unveil our underlying perceptions about life and death. 

Location upon RSVP

RSVP required to justinek@publicspheresalons.com

 

Plato's Cyclical Argument

"Socrates mentions an ancient theory holding that just as the souls of the dead in the underworld come from those living in this world, the living souls come back from those of the dead (70c-d).  He uses this theory as the inspiration for his first argument, which may be reconstructed as follows:

1. All things come to be from their opposite states: for example, something that comes to be “larger” must necessarily have been “smaller” before (70e-71a).

2. Between every pair of opposite states there are two opposite processes: for example, between the pair “smaller” and “larger” there are the processes “increase” and “decrease” (71b).

3. If the two opposite processes did not balance each other out, everything would eventually be in the same state: for example, if increase did not balance out decrease, everything would keep becoming smaller and smaller (72b).

4.  Since “being alive” and “being dead” are opposite states, and “dying” and “coming-to-life” are the two opposite processes between these states, coming-to-life must balance out dying (71c-e).

5. Therefore, everything that dies must come back to life again (72a)."

Excerpt from Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

 

 

 

 

Image Attribution: Andrea Mantegna [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

On Eccentricity

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